Embryonic Origin of Tissues

Dublin Core

Title

Embryonic Origin of Tissues

Subject

Tissues
Embryonic

Description

The zygote, or fertilized egg, is a single cell formed by the fusion of an egg and sperm. After fertilization the zygote gives rise to rapid mitotic cycles, generating many cells to form the embryo. The first embryonic cells generated have the ability to differentiate into any type of cell in the body and, as such, are called totipotent, meaning each has the capacity to divide, differentiate, and develop into a new organism. As cell proliferation progresses, three major cell lineages are established within the embryo. As explained in a later chapter, each of these lineages of embryonic cells forms the distinct germ layers from which all the tissues and organs of the human body eventually form. Each germ layer is identified by its relative position: ectoderm (ecto- = “outer”), mesoderm (meso- = “middle”), and endoderm (endo- = “inner”). The types of tissues and organs associated with the each of the three germ layers. Note that epithelial tissue originates in all three layers, whereas nervous tissue derives primarily from the ectoderm and muscle tissue from mesoderm.

Contributor

Cut Rita Zahara

Rights

Creative Commons

Type

Image

Files

Embryonic Origin of Tissues.jpg

Citation

“Embryonic Origin of Tissues,” Open Educational Resource (OER) - USK Library, accessed June 25, 2024, http://uilis.usk.ac.id/oer/items/show/981.