Dorsal and Ventral Body Cavities

Dublin Core

Title

Dorsal and Ventral Body Cavities

Subject

Dorsal
Ventral Body
Human Anatomy

Description

The posterior (dorsal) and anterior (ventral) cavities are each subdivided into smaller cavities. In the posterior (dorsal) cavity, the cranial cavity houses the brain, and the spinal cavity (or vertebral cavity) encloses the spinal cord. Just as the brain and spinal cord make up a continuous, uninterrupted structure, the cranial and spinal cavities that house them are also continuous. The brain and spinal cord are protected by the bones of the skull and vertebral column and by cerebrospinal fluid, a colorless fluid produced by the brain, which cushions the brain and spinal cord within the posterior (dorsal) cavity.

The anterior (ventral) cavity has two main subdivisions: the thoracic cavity and the abdominopelvic cavity (see [link]). The thoracic cavity is the more superior subdivision of the anterior cavity, and it is enclosed by the rib cage. The thoracic cavity contains the lungs and the heart, which is located in the mediastinum. The diaphragm forms the floor of the thoracic cavity and separates it from the more inferior abdominopelvic cavity. The abdominopelvic cavity is the largest cavity in the body. Although no membrane physically divides the abdominopelvic cavity, it can be useful to distinguish between the abdominal cavity, the division that houses the digestive organs, and the pelvic cavity, the division that houses the organs of reproduction.

Contributor

Cut Rita Zahara

Rights

Creative Commons

Type

Image

Files

110_Dorsal_Ventral_Body_Cavities.jpg

Citation

“Dorsal and Ventral Body Cavities,” Open Educational Resource (OER) - USK Library, accessed June 15, 2024, http://uilis.usk.ac.id/oer/items/show/788.