Habitats and Biota of the Gulf of Mexico: Before the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

Dublin Core

Title

Habitats and Biota of the Gulf of Mexico: Before the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

Subject

Habitats and Biota

Description

The Gulf of Mexico is the ninth largest body of water in the world, and it is recognized as 1 of 64 Large Marine Ecosystems by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) (Kumpf et al. 1999). Economically and ecologically the Gulf is one of the most productive and important bodies of water (Tunnell 2009; Fautin et al. 2010; NOS/NOAA 2011;
Yoskowitz et al. 2013), occupying a surface area of more than 1.5 million square kilometers (km2 ) (579,153 square miles [mi2 ]), a maximum east–west dimension of 1,573 km (977 mi), and 900 km (559 mi) from north to south between the Mississippi Delta and Yucata´n Peninsula. The shoreline, which extends counterclockwise from Cape Sable, Florida, to Cabo Catoche, Quintana Roo, Mexico, is approximately 5,696 km (3,539 mi) long, and it includes another 380 km (236 mi) of Gulf shoreline in Cuba from Cabo San Antonio in the west to Havana in the east
(Tunnell 2009; Fautin et al. 2010).

Creator

C. Herb Ward

Source

https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007%2F978-1-4939-3447-8.pdf

Publisher

Spinggers

Date

2017

Contributor

Baihaqi

Rights

Creative Commons

Format

PDF

Language

English

Type

Textbooks

Files

Collection

Citation

C. Herb Ward, “Habitats and Biota of the Gulf of Mexico: Before the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill,” Open Educational Resource (OER) - USK Library, accessed February 29, 2024, http://uilis.usk.ac.id/oer/items/show/3081.

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